Bath is famed for its rows of Georgian houses, here seen with their local Bath Stone glowing golden in the evening light. This local limestone has been used since Roman times for buildings in the city, giving it a pleasing uniformity.
Bath – Fact Check

Nothing beats Bath bathing in the sun

Photo by Jochem Wijnands

Bath – Fact Check Nothing beats Bath bathing in the sun

Every guidebook calls Bath “honey-colored”. At sunrise and sunset it may be.

Kieran Meeke
Kieran Meeke Travel Writer

But on a dull English day the natural color of the stone from which it is made is closer to a pale ivory. Still warmer than the gray granite and much more refined than the red brick of many other townscapes, it gives the city a pleasing aspect that delights visitors.

“Bath is not a planned city but a series of developments,” says architect Nick Jones, who has lived here for 30 years. Originally from Wales, he still has that country’s passion for rugby, and a stocky build to match, though these days his allegiance is to Bath Rugby Club.

“What brings the city together is its homogeneity, because of the consistent use of Bath Stone and similar classical styles of architecture. It is the color and the style.” Nick says that, because of its stone, Bath’s origins go back millions of years.

Ready to immerse yourself in Bath's baths? Our local expert has the perfect hotel for you – it's called Royal for a reason...

jdw14624

With its rows of sweeping curves and columns, Bath's architecture owes much to Roman influence and led to it being designated a World Heritage Site in 1987. The houses were originally built as boarding rooms for visitors to the hot springs which gave the city its name. Photo by Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

Nikon D2X

Aperture
ƒ/6.7
Exposure
1/180
ISO
125
Focal
24 mm

With its rows of sweeping curves and columns, Bath's architecture owes much to Roman influence and led to it being designated a World Heritage Site in 1987. The houses were originally built as boarding rooms for visitors to the hot springs which gave the city its name.

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