Buns at Sally Lunn's House
Bath – Fact Check

What do Panama, Venice, Denver, and Bath have in common?

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Bath – Fact Check What do Panama, Venice, Denver, and Bath have in common?

Panama hats, Venetian blinds, Denver boot… the list of places with things named after them is a long one, but Bath has the distinction of having two.

Kieran Meeke
Kieran Meeke Travel Writer

In Bath, it became fashionable to be carried, dressed in a nightgown and wrapped in blankets, to and from the baths in a sedan chair. Carried by two strong men, the enclosed boxes preserved modesty.

In due course, a design on wheels that required only one man to pull or push was invented in 1750 by local man James Heath. Known as the Bath Chair, it soon became a familiar sight on the streets of the town, as well as spas worldwide. Its tiller steering design was the forerunner of that on early cars.

Even earlier, French Huguenot refugee Sally Lunn arrived in Bath in 1680 bringing a recipe for brioche bread that evolved into the Sally Lunn bun. Light and sweet, they were a welcome contrast to other heavy breads of the time.

Her recipe is still a secret but a similar style of roll has become known as a Bath Bun. Nearly a million were eaten during London's Great Exhibition of 1851, introducing them to wider fame.

Hot baths, delicious buns... and Truly Wonderful hotels. Bath has got it all!

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