Sport fishing is a popular activity around Cape Cod, with a common catch being striped bass such as this angler is showing off. The many shoals and saltwater creeks of the cape host numerous bait fish that in turn attract larger game fish.
Cape Cod – Been There

There are (literally) tons of cool fish living off Cape Cod

Photo by Eric Kulin

Cape Cod – Been There There are (literally) tons of cool fish living off Cape Cod

The most natural outdoor activities on Cape Cod are water-related: including kayaking, windsurfing, canoeing and boating. Whale-watching trips are also popular and fishing is in the blood of many residents.

Michael Schuman
Michael Schuman

Ryan Collins, 29, went fishing for the first time when he was five. “By age ten it was an obsession,” the dark-haired, bearded fisherman says. “Now it’s a passion and a lifestyle.” There is much more than cod on the Cape and you will not see much of it in Ryan’s kayak or 20-foot Hydra sport boat.

“I usually fish within five miles of shore, where striped bass and bluefish are more common. I've been fortunate to catch tuna from 30 to 700 lbs off Cape Cod. There are tons of cool fish living off Cape Cod and unusual species show up each season. During 2013 there was a sailfish caught from shore in the Cape Cod Canal.

“Despite fishing pressure, the ocean around Cape Cod is bursting at the seams with life. One day growing up, I caught a 35-lb striped bass before rescuing two stranded pilot whales. That’s just the tip of the iceberg, too. Anyone who’s fished here for any amount of time has a story like that.

“Now we have great white sharks all over the place. If you go to a beach in Chatham you have a good chance of seeing a 16-ft great white devour a 300-lb seal just off the beach.”

Visiting Cape Cod? Check out TRVL's Cape Cod guide 

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Cape Cod's oysters were recorded as early as 1605 but by the early 1800s the beds had been seriously depleted, both for eating and in construction. Local oysters are now mainly raised in farms for shipment to the lucrative Boston market. Photo by Richard Green / Alamy

Richard Green

Richard Green

Agency
Alamy

Cape Cod's oysters were recorded as early as 1605 but by the early 1800s the beds had been seriously depleted, both for eating and in construction. Local oysters are now mainly raised in farms for shipment to the lucrative Boston market.

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