The red-eyed leaf frog (Agalychnis callidryas) depends on its bright coloring to startle potential predators, giving itself precious time to escape. The frogs are not venomous and live in the rain forest canopy, using their long, sticky tongues to catch insects such as moths by night.
Costa Rica – Photo Tip

A travel photographer has to be good at everything

Photo by Frans Lemmens

Costa Rica – Photo Tip A travel photographer has to be good at everything

Architecture, nature, landscapes or people, all are important if you want to document a destination and do it justice. So a travel photographer has to be a good all-rounder.

Frans Lemmens
Frans Lemmens Travel Photographer

Nature and wildlife are phenomenal in Costa Rica and the amazing red-eyed tree-frog is one of the most photogenic animals living there. Unfortunately, many of the photos you see published these days are actually shot in a studio setting. Most wildlife is not easy to photograph in the wild.

I always seek the assistance of a nature guide to help me find the animal I am looking for. It saves a lot of time and a guide will explain what I can and cannot do. On this occasion we were lucky to find a couple of frogs after only five minutes. But it took me the rest of the day to get some really interesting shots.

For wildlife I brought a 100mm macro lens, which enables you get really close and work with precious little depth of field. In case of the treefrog you can make the eyes stand out even more. The problem I was faced with was having both eyes in focus at the same time. The number of times the frogs jumped away and I had to replace my tripod are countless, but of course we never talk about that.

Let's find that frog!

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The frogs are not venomous and live in the rain forest canopy, using their long, sticky tongues to catch insects such as moths by night. Photo by Frans Lemmens / Getty Images

Frans Lemmens

Frans Lemmens

Agency
Getty Images

The frogs are not venomous and live in the rain forest canopy, using their long, sticky tongues to catch insects such as moths by night.

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