A waitress serves up cocktails at a beach bar at the east coast resort of Perissa on Santorini. The black sands of the beach here are a legacy of volcanic rock from an explosion 3,000 years ago that has now been ground down to fine grains.
Greece – Photo Tip

Why good photos always come back to faces

Photo by Jochem Wijnands

Greece – Photo Tip Why good photos always come back to faces

While shooting on Santorini, I was reminded that you really get to know a destination through the people that live and work there.

Jochem Wijnands
Jochem Wijnands Founder / photographer

Santorini is one of the small, beautiful islands that make up the Cyclades and have communities that are tightly knit and ancient, going back thousands of years. But the tourists and seasonal workers have created communities too, which overlap with the local ones. It’s interesting to see the sharp contrasts between old and new, the local and the visitor, the future and the past.

When portraying a destination through its people, the choice of who to photograph becomes important. These people should be iconic, representing the different communities. On Santorini, I photographed a Greek orthodox priest (of course) and old widow dressed in black, a bouzouki player and a fisherman.

The contrast between the young carefree girl working in a beach bar for the summer (above) and the local muleteer carrying loads up a steep flight of stairs 25 times a day for 300 days a year (below) is as big as it gets. Yet they both make up Santorini and they both share a love for the island.

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A man with a mule is ready to take the luggage of a tourist up the steep cliffs from Santorini's port Athinios to the capital Fira, some 260 meters above. While many travellers take a cable car, bus or taxi to reach the heights, trekking the 560 steps to the summit by mule or donkey is an iconic Santorini experience. Photo by Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

Nikon SUPER COOLSCAN 4000 ED

A man with a mule is ready to take the luggage of a tourist up the steep cliffs from Santorini's port Athinios to the capital Fira, some 260 meters above. While many travellers take a cable car, bus or taxi to reach the heights, trekking the 560 steps to the summit by mule or donkey is an iconic Santorini experience.

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