Thousands of adult seals are killed annually by hunters such as this one near Tiniteqilaq in East Greenland but the large seal population is not under threat. Most remote communities depend on seals for survival, with the meat being the national dish and the skins sold for making hats, gloves and furs.
Greenland – Photo Tip

You need these Winter photography tips

Photo by Peter Adams

Greenland – Photo Tip You need these Winter photography tips

Winter is on its way. Find out how to get the best photos with these tips from pro photographer Peter Adams.

Peter Adams
Peter Adams Travel Photographer

One of the great challenges of photography is to translate the pure white canvas of a snowy landscape into a meaningful picture.

I'm in Greenland to photograph seal hunters. Usually with a human portrait, my instinct would be to get up close to my subject but in this case, I wanted to convey the context and space of the landscape this seal hunter survives in. If you look closely at the picture above, you'll spot crosses in the cemetery. By putting them into my picture they help give the viewer a measure of the size as well as the harshness of this environment.

Another challenge, of course, is looking after your camera gear in the cold. Modern camera batteries have improved enormously but will still drain quickly in cold conditions. Recharge when you can and carry spare batteries. And above all: keep the camera as warm as possible when outside – tuck it under your jacket when you're not shooting.

Condensation is another big problem: stepping into the cold from a heated house will cause a fogged lens and viewfinder, and in extreme cases even a short circuit. Let temperature changes happen gradually by putting your camera somewhere unheated before going outside. When going back indoors, put the camera in an airtight bag with some silica gel so moisture will form on the outside of the bag and not the camera.

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Tiniteqilaq – often called "Tinit" for short – has a population of 134 people, who mostly survive by hunting, ice fishing and fishing for salmon in summer. Inuit graves in its cemetery, seen here in winter, bear no names because of the tradition that a dead person's name lives on in the next generation. Photo by Peter Adams

Peter Adams

Peter Adams

Canon 1DS II

Aperture
ƒ/8
Exposure
1/250
ISO
125
Focal
160 mm

Tiniteqilaq – often called "Tinit" for short – has a population of 134 people, who mostly survive by hunting, ice fishing and fishing for salmon in summer. Inuit graves in its cemetery, seen here in winter, bear no names because of the tradition that a dead person's name lives on in the next generation.

Tiniteqilaq – often called "Tinit" for short – has a population of 134 people, who mostly survive by hunting, ice fishing and fishing for salmon in summer. Inuit graves in its cemetery, seen here in winter, bear no names because of the tradition that a dead person's name lives on in the next generation.

 

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