The Day of the Dead is a chance to dress as a zombie or monster for the day, a relatively recent trend that owes much to Halloween costumes. Christian beliefs merged with very ancient indigenous rituals to evolve into modern customs that are still in the process of change.
Guanajuato – Photo Tip

The technique behind spontaneity

Photo by Kike del Olmo

Guanajuato – Photo Tip The technique behind spontaneity

The most enjoyable aspect of being a photographer is finding myself in a variety of different situations. The most challenging aspect is how to convey one's own feelings at those very moments.

Kike del Olmo
Kike del Olmo Travel Photographer

When it comes to photography, spontaneity and technique are key. For spontaneity, one has to always be alert to one's surroundings and - more importantly - master technique so as to capture the evocative image that tells a story.

In the image of the boy dressed in white, there was very little light, and his ethereal appearance was perfect. To lend the image a spectral quality, I used a flash at a slow shutter speed to partially freeze the subject, while allowing the background to blur. Flash is a perfect tool as a filler or to create control lighting, while taking into account ambient light, so as to place a subject in context.

In the case of the girl in the skeleton costume, the situation was entirely different. It was enough to keep an eye on my camera's main settings, calibrating aperture and speed as the light changed, so I was able to react quickly. That is the best way to avoid images that appear too staged.

36-guanajuato-301013-0087

Skulls are an important symbol of Day of the Dead celebrations, with roots traced back to Meso-American civilizations who kept them as trophies. The Spanish failed to stamp out indigenous beliefs but did move the rituals to coincide with the Catholic All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day (November 1 and 2). Photo by Kike del Olmo

Kike del Olmo

Kike del Olmo

Skulls are an important symbol of Day of the Dead celebrations, with roots traced back to Meso-American civilizations who kept them as trophies. The Spanish failed to stamp out indigenous beliefs but did move the rituals to coincide with the Catholic All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day (November 1 and 2).

Other stories about Guanajuato