The waters of the Blue Lagoon contain minerals, silica and algae and the six million liters of water are renewed every two days. Its Research and Development facility continues research into the treatment of skin ailments such as psoriasis, for which it is already noted.
Iceland – Photo Tip

Why keeping focus will make you a better photographer

Photo by Jurjen Drenth

Iceland – Photo Tip Why keeping focus will make you a better photographer

The Blue Lagoon is not only Iceland’s most popular tourist destination but also a photographer’s dream.

Jurjen Drenth
Jurjen Drenth Travel Photographer

With that great transparent color blue, all that steam and rays of sunlight coming through, it is hard not to take a good photo. The biggest challenge may be to keep your camera from getting soaked.

It is tempting to get swept up in the setting and go for a general view, but a photo needs a focus. That’s why I asked this girl, wearing a Santa hat, to pose for me. I deliberately isolated her from the other people in the pool to leave some of the story untold. What is this girl doing at Christmas in this pool? Is she really there alone? What’s that smile saying?

On a more practical level, to reduce condensation on the lens, your camera has to be the same temperature as the surroundings. Even so, you need to keep a dry cloth handy to wipe excess moisture away.

www.jurjendrenth.nl

Iceland, Kevlavik. Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon's color comes from its high silicon content, the mineral being leeched from rocks 2,000 meters deep by the super-hot waters that power Svartsengi Geothermal Power Plant. The subterranean water is about 240°C. Photo by Jurjen Drenth

Jurjen Drenth

Jurjen Drenth

Nikon SUPER COOLSCAN 5000 ED

The Blue Lagoon's color comes from its high silicon content, the mineral being leeched from rocks 2,000 meters deep by the super-hot waters that power Svartsengi Geothermal Power Plant. The subterranean water is about 240°C.

Other stories about Iceland