The FSLN – Sandinista National Liberation Front – remains popular in Nicaragua, as this march in Granada testifies, and is the current ruling party. It takes its name from Augusto César Sandino, who led Nicaraguan guerilla resistance to the U.S. occupation in the 1930s.
Nicaragua – Been There

A willingness to be photographed shows happiness

Photo by Ton Koene

Nicaragua – Been There A willingness to be photographed shows happiness

The majority of my travels are in developing countries where I photograph conflicts and the consequences of war, such as refugees. Often, people do not want to be photographed and, in some cases, are even aggressive. But not in Nicaragua.

Ton Koene
Ton Koene Travel Photographer

Although it is not a rich country, Nicaragua is relatively advanced and safe. In my experience, the willingness to be photographed is an indicator for happiness in life. And Nicaraguans do not mind being photographed. Actually, most seem to love it.

This woman (below) was a good example. She was concentrating on her work and, when I approached with my camera, she looked up, gave me a small nod as a sign of permission and continued. She was typical of almost all Nicaraguans: kind to strangers and especially to annoying photographers. It is a photographer’s dream.

In Granada, this FSLN march (above) gathered an assorted bunch of people: government employees, veteran and wannabe revolutionaries but also many young people. As in every society, for some the occasion seems secondary to having fun. They are full of energy and joy. I climbed on a truck in front to have a better view.

What makes the picture come alive is the guy in the green shirt. He seems to be a real partygoer, keen to be in the picture. Such exuberant behavior is contagious and helps get the show going. People like this are a blessing for every photographer, as well as the event organizer.

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Masaya was an important center of pre-Colombia pottery production and the tradition continues today, boosted by government help in the 1990s. Its craft market is the largest in the country, as befits a town known as the cradle of Nicaraguan folklore. Photo by Ton Koene

Ton Koene

Ton Koene

Canon 5D-III

Aperture
ƒ/3.2
Exposure
1/400
ISO
500
Focal
24 mm

Masaya was an important center of pre-Colombia pottery production and the tradition continues today, boosted by government help in the 1990s. Its craft market is the largest in the country, as befits a town known as the cradle of Nicaraguan folklore.

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