Legend has it that, on the day seven sisters marry seven brothers from the Lysefjord area, Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock) will fall into the fjord below. The huge wave that results will then wipe out all life in the surrounding area.
Norway – Photo Tip

Why using people will make you a better photographer

Photo by Lucas Vallecillos

Norway – Photo Tip Why using people will make you a better photographer

Few places in the world are home to such magnificent sights as Norway, where the environment takes on a sublime beauty.

Lucas Vallecillos
Lucas Vallecillos Travel Photographer

For specialized landscape photographers, that makes it a favorite destination, especially the fjord region which is an inexhaustible source of wonderful images. For landscapes, I usually follow a few very simple rules, but ones that can greatly enrich the picture.

I always try to include people or, if there is a road, a car. These elements of familiar size help to give a sense of scale to the image. For example, this photo of Preikestolen (top) without the two girls would make it much harder for the viewer to understand the grandeur of the place.

To make sure the images are crisp, I usually close an aperture between f /11 and f/18 to ensure a wide depth of field and that the whole image is in focus. When I close the diaphragm so much, that drives down the shutter speed and sometimes I have to use a tripod, like in this photo of the Atlantic Road.

Finally, remember that the first three hours of the day and the last three offer the best light for landscape photos.

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Storseisundet Bridge on the Atlantic Road is familiar from its use in multiple car adverts. Financed partly through tolls, its cost was paid off earlier than anticipated due to the high number of touring visitors it helped attract. Photo by Lucas Vallecillos

Lucas Vallecillos

Lucas Vallecillos

Canon EOS 5D Mark II

Aperture
ƒ/18
Exposure
1/80
ISO
100
Focal
85 mm

Storseisundet Bridge on the Atlantic Road is familiar from its use in multiple car adverts. Financed partly through tolls, its cost was paid off earlier than anticipated due to the high number of touring visitors it helped attract.

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