The colorful carriages of the Number 22 tram run a route from Nádraží Hostivar to Bílá Hora. It passes many of Prague's most scenic views, including the National Theatre, the Belveder and Prague Castle.
Prague – Been There

A ride past the Dancing House

Photo by Carpe Diem

Prague – Been There A ride past the Dancing House

Silvie gets on Tram 22 with her two daughters. They have just had lunch at Café Louvre, one of Prague’s most storied dining establishments. She moved to Prague from South Bohemia nine years ago.

Jacy Meyer
Jacy Meyer Travel Writer

If I have to choose between metro or tram, I’ll go for the tram every time for the views,” she says. “Especially up from Malostranská, it’s like a sightseeing tour.”

When the tram gets to Karlovo Náměstí, it takes a left, heading up the hill to the leafy district of Vinohrady, where Silvie lives. Originally covered with royal vineyards, the neighborhood is popular and hip; home to many expats, good restaurants and ethnic food shops.

“We didn’t know anything about Vinohrady when we first moved here, we just thought it was pretty and close to the center,” she says. “Now I can’t imagine living anywhere else.” The gems to be seen from the tram here include the baroque Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola, built in 1670, and a quick flash in bright contrast of Frank Gehry’s Dancing House.

At I.P. Pavlova, there is a metro stop and another big passenger exchange. More people get off than on and the car relaxes a bit. The busy commercial area quickly turns genteel, with a farmers' market off to the right and then refined pastel-painted buildings lining the streets.

Vinohrady is anchored by the towering gothic St. Ludmila Church on Náměstí Míru. The name translates as Peace Square and the atmosphere is appropriate: the elderly sun themselves on the square, most happily relaxing with a dog by their side. At Christmas, there is a popular market here. Riding through, I catch tantalizing glimpses of possibility down every street. This is an area that demands you to explore her side streets.

Take me there!

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The "Dancing House" is a 1996 building designed by Czech architect Vlado Milunic and Canadian architect Frank Gehry in the form of a dancing couple. Also called "Ginger & Fred", it stands on the site of a house destroyed by World War II bombing in 1945 and has a rooftop French restaurant with a view of Prague Castle and the river. Photo by Luis Dafos

Luis Dafos

Luis Dafos

Fuji FinePix X100

Aperture
ƒ/4
Exposure
1/8
ISO
640
Focal
23 mm

The "Dancing House" is a 1996 building designed by Czech architect Vlado Milunic and Canadian architect Frank Gehry in the form of a dancing couple. Also called "Ginger & Fred", it stands on the site of a house destroyed by World War II bombing in 1945 and has a rooftop French restaurant with a view of Prague Castle and the river.

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