Cafe Tomaselli has a 300-year history, with former patrons such as Mozart, Max Reinhardt and Herbert von Karajan.
Salzburg - Been There

Secrets of a Salzburg coffee house

Photo by Martin Thomas

Salzburg - Been There Secrets of a Salzburg coffee house

To understand Salzburg, you have to understand its coffee house culture and the uniquely Austrian quality of "schmah".

Kieran Meeke
Kieran Meeke Travel Writer

“We go to the coffee house for everything,” says Johann, a Salzburg taxi driver. “To read or to be alone, to concentrate or learn something, for the news or to watch people. I like to look around and think; ‘What is he doing? Where is she going? A good coffee house is like a club, you can do everything there.”

Johann gives me a tip on how to spot if people want to talk. “We are not stupid: we have different-sized tables! You choose a table for what you want. There are tables for one, two, three or more. Tables for every situation and every emotion. Every coffee house has a minimum of two rooms and the ceilings are very high so that you don’t have to smell each other.”

This banter is the epitome of the Austrian quality  (pronounced ‘shmay’). Considered an expression of charm, it can be delivered as jokes, comments or tricks and always expresses a friendly, ironic sort of naughtiness. Schmäh reflects its subversive historical background, having grown from the way that below-stairs servants made fun of their masters. It results in a harmless anarchic battle of wits in a style that has gone on in coffee houses for hundreds of years.

While coffee house traditions in other parts of Austria have become somewhat diluted, those of Salzburg have not. The 300 year-old Café Tomaselli and its marginally newer counterparts the Cafés Bazar and Fürst still have waiters in dinner jackets, pastry bars and special holders for a range of international newspapers. The prolific Thomas Bernhard produced most of his work in these places. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his father were habitués as were Max Reinhardt, Marlene Dietrich, Thomas Mann, Arturo Toscanini, Arthur Miller and many more.

Johann, a very young 60-year-old tells me that different types of people traditionally visit at different times. “Older men like me” stay until exactly mid-day, he says. “What about the ladies?” I ask. His response is deadpan: “That depends on their age.”

Bazar-Terrasse, Cafe Bazar on Elisabethkai, Salzburg, Austria, Europe, PublicGround

The terrace of Cafe Bazar has views over the Salzach to the old part of town, Mönchsberg hill and Hohensalzburg. Photo by Martin Siepmann / Alamy

Martin Siepmann

Martin Siepmann

Agency
Alamy

The terrace of Cafe Bazar has views over the Salzach to the old part of town, Mönchsberg hill and Hohensalzburg.

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