A chinstrap penguin walking through the former Grytviken whaling station. The birds are named for a narrow black band running under their heads that makes them easily identifiable. There are thought to be some 12million in the sub-Antarctic region and Antarctica.
South Georgia – Photo Tip

Do you want many decent photos, or one great shot?

Photo by Jochem Wijnands

South Georgia – Photo Tip Do you want many decent photos, or one great shot?

South Georgia is very remote. Visitors, who all arrive by cruise ship, get very little time to actually spend on shore, especially if the weather is bad.

Jochem Wijnands
Jochem Wijnands Founder / photographer

The vistas and the wildlife are overwhelming, which leaves you with very little time to reflect and explore your options. Before you know it, you find yourself in a what feels like a drive-by shooting and, in the blink of an eye, you find you have left the scene and South Georgia is already behind you.

Here the quantity versus quality decision is very relevant as it’s unlikely you’ll ever get a second chance. Should you concentrate on one great image, or try to get as many decent shots in as time permits?

In the process of becoming a professional photographer, I decided that one great shot a day is what it is all about. But in South Georgia I had to fight off my natural impulse to run around and shoot as much as possible.

So when we landed at the former whaling station in Grytviken I decided to concentrate on the alienating combination of wildlife and the remains of the blubber factory. I spent these few precious hours just trying to capture these two totally different worlds in one photo.

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South Georgia once had six whaling stations and Grytviken was the first to open, in 1904, and the last to close, in 1962. It processed more than 53,000 whales, a rate of slaughter that saw the humpback whale virtually extinct in the Antarctic by the mid-1930s. Photo by Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

Jochem Wijnands

NIKON D3S

Aperture
ƒ/28/5
Exposure
1/160
ISO
500
Focal
70/1 mm

South Georgia once had six whaling stations and Grytviken was the first to open, in 1904, and the last to close, in 1962. It processed more than 53,000 whales, a rate of slaughter that saw the humpback whale virtually extinct in the Antarctic by the mid-1930s.

 

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