Massive surf conditions turn the Bondi Icebergs Pool white during the traditional winter weekly swim.
Sydney – Photo Tip

When taking photos, never lose concentration

Photo by Paul Lovelace

Sydney – Photo Tip When taking photos, never lose concentration

The surf at Bondi happened to be particularly big one day and, as you can see, the waves got very high. But what happened next was unprecedented.

Paul Lovelace
Paul Lovelace

Suddenly the Bondi Icebergs pool went completely white for about ten seconds. Fortunately, I had set my camera to Manual Exposure, having already taken several shots beforehand. If I had exposed the image using Aperture Priority, this image would have been two stops underexposed on the swimmers' skin tones.

As soon as this massive surf created this white ice effect, it was suddenly as if I was on a news assignment, where if you lose concentration for even a few seconds the shot has gone.

Nature works in mysterious ways and all the times that I have been in this spot before, I have never experienced this all-white look. It's ironic that is pool is known as the Bondi Icebergs – named for the club of guys who built it so they could stay fit by swimming all winter.

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The Iceberg Swimming Club was started by local lifesavers who wanted to stay fit during the winter months. To maintain membership, swimmers must compete on three Sundays out of four during a period of five years. Started in 1929, it was 1994 before the first women were admitted. Photo by Paul Lovelace

Paul Lovelace

Paul Lovelace

Canon EOS D30

Aperture
ƒ/11
Exposure
1/350
ISO
200
Focal
20 mm

The Iceberg Swimming Club was started by local lifesavers who wanted to stay fit during the winter months. To maintain membership, swimmers must compete on three Sundays out of four during a period of five years. Started in 1929, it was 1994 before the first women were admitted.

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